The Wheel and the Web -The Changing Characteristics of Leadership in the Modern World

Women Studies / April 23, 2015 / No Comments /
This paper is an analysis and comparison of two types of leadership – the “Wheel” and the “Web”.

This paper analyzes and compares two types of leadership – the “Wheel” and the “Web”. The author sees that the twentieth century was marked by a series of economical, social and political changes that resulted in the restructuring and transformation of a number of traditional beliefs and customary views. This process, he believes, changed the fundamental framework of leadership, transforming it from the “wheel” that supported the Industrial Age to the “web” that forms the heart of the Age of Information. The “wheel” type of leadership is recognized by the fundamental traits of command, control and power and is commonly associated with the male leadership characteristics of individuality and autonomy. On the other hand, the leadership known as the “web”, incorporates the basic traits of collaboration, communication and participation and is recognized by the characteristics of organization and cooperation that have come to be commonly associated with modern female leadership . This paper describes the face of modern female leadership as well as famous female leaders.

Table of Contents
I. A Transformation
II. The Face of Modern Female Leadership
III. Contrast, Comparison & Conclusion
“”Leaders are visionaries with a poorly developed sense of fear and no concept of the odds against them…they make things happen” ~ Robert Jarvick, inventor of the artificial heart (Leadership). The characteristic mark of leadership and the traits of those who have excelled at it can be traced throughout the pages of world history and down through the centuries of the development of human civilization. Up until the twentieth century, these traits and characteristics showed some modification but little basic and fundamental change. The twentieth century, however, was marked by a series of economical, social and political changes that resulted in the restructuring and transformation of a number of traditional beliefs and customary views. This restructuring process included basic changes in the fundamental framework of leadership, transforming it from the “wheel” that supported the Industrial Age to the “web” that forms the heart of the Age of Information (Guido-DiBrito et al, 1996, pp. 28-29).”


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