Night: The Struggle to Survive

Literature / April 23, 2015 / No Comments /
A review of Elie Wiesel’s `Night` on his horrifying experiences of the Auschwitz and Buchenwald concentration camps.

This paper describes Elie Wiesel’s account of his days in the concentration camps under the Nazis during WWII. The paper looks at how Wiesel describes the torture, abuse, and inhumane treatment that he experienced amongst his family and fellow Jews and discusses how survival was an impossible journey that only the bravest and strongest could achieve. The paper emphasizes how Wiesel’s strong faith in God, struggle for survival, and moral maturity gave him the power, courage, and wit to outlive the adverse years of the Holocaust.
Life at Auschwitz is an intolerable, excruciating experience that extremely small fractions survive. The ones who do survive all show one trait: faith. They could be oppressed both physically and mentally, but no one could oppress their souls. Throughout the memoir’s progression, Elie’s faith in God keeps growing stronger. His faith in God is very strong for such a young child, and his faith continues to flourish as time goes on. Elie Wiesel lives his early childhood in the town of Transylvania, in Hungary, during the early 1940s. At a young age, Elie takes a strong interest in the Jewish religion as he spends most of his time studying the Talmud. He yearns to be educated and to gain to additional knowledge of his religion. He believes he can sufficiently learn the most complicated areas of Judaism, deciding to learn all that he possibly can. Elie’s life is so much surrounded by the ways of Judaism that even his name traces back to a servant of Abraham and to a son of Moses (Roth 30).


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