The Third Battle of the Aisne

International Relations / April 23, 2015 / No Comments /
This paper is a description of the third battle of the Aisne River, a German victory in World War I.

This paper is an examination of the third battle of the Aisne. It details this excellent demonstration of the strengths of the German army during World War I as well as demonstrates why these particular strengths were not sufficient to win the war. It describes this German offensive that began on May 27, 1918. The author believes that the German success in this battle came about as the result of the finely honed German infantry tactics combined with a furiously concentrated artillery bombardment, operating under a sky dominated by the ‘Jagdgeschwader’ of the VII German army. But he feels that in the end, this battle did not help the Germans win the war in any way, in fact, it actually backfired at them.
“The Third Battle of the Aisne is most certainly not one of the best known battles of World War I. Perhaps this is merely because of that oldest of all war adages, which is that the victors get to write the histories, and that in the aftermath of the war late German victories were brushed aside. Perhaps it is not that often cited simply because, while every battle in a war is important, this one was not a turning point. And yet the battle does deserve to be examined as an excellent demonstration of the strengths of the German army during the Great War as well as a demonstration of why, in the end, these particular strengths would not be sufficient to win the war.”


Leave a Reply