The Connection Between God and Gaia

Geology and Geophysics / April 23, 2015 / No Comments /
This essay is a review of James Lovelock’s book The Ages of Gaia. Written for a Geology class, this paper compares the Creation Theory to the Evolution Theory, and how God could have had a part in the formation of the Earth.

This is a critical essay on the concept of Gaia (the earth being one living breathing organism) as put forth by James Lovelock in his book, The Ages of Gaia. The author addresses three questions put forth by Lovelock: What would the Universe be like without God? How can we use the concept of God as a way to look at the Universe and ourselves? How can we use the concept of Gaia as a way to understanding God? Through these questions, the author gives us her own opinion regarding the co-existence of both God and Gaia.

Gaia is a religious as well as a scientific concept, and in both spheres it is manageable. Theology is also a science, but if it is to operate by the same rules as the rest of science, there is no place for creeds or dogma. By this I mean theology should not state that God exists and then proceed to investigate his nature and his interactions with the Universe and living organisms. Such an approach is prescriptive, presupposes his existence, and closes the mind to such questions as: What would the Universe be like without God? How can we use the concept of God as a way to look at the Universe and ourselves? How can we use the concept of Gaia as a way to understanding God? Belief in God is an act of faith and will remain so. In the same way, it is otiose to try to prove that Gaia is alive. Instead, Gaia should be a way to view the Earth, ourselves, and our relationships with living things (Lovelock 194). In this passage, Lovelock states that the concept of Gaia is both religious and scientific. I agree with him, but not under the same terms. In this essay, I will contend Lovelock’s assumptions and propose new ideas for thought, with an interconnection between God and Gaia, instead of keeping them as separate principles.


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