Precarious Dependencies

Ethnic Studies / April 23, 2015 / No Comments /
This paper explores the ethnographic perspective of Lesley Gill’s `Precarious Dependencies`.

This paper analyzes Lesley Gill’s ethnographic work “Precarious Dependencies” and examines the relationships between Aymara-speaking domestic servants and their upper-class women employers in La Paz from 1930 to the late 1980s. The paper provides insight into the nature of class, gender, and race in Bolivia and the oppression of women in general. It discusses the important use anthropology in our post-colonial world.
“Lesley Gill’s ethnography Precarious Dependencies examines the relationships between Aymara-speaking domestic servants and their upper-class women employers in La Paz from 1930 to the late 1980s. While the work is in many ways like any good ethnography about the particular daily content of the lives of these women, it is also like any good ethnography about broader issues as well, and Gill clearly intends for us to read from her careful descriptions of what has happened in Bolivia a more general way to investigate how the general subordination of women can be understood in the context of class, race, and ethnic inequality.”


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