Puritanism in Hawthorne’s Young Goodman Brown

English / April 23, 2015 / No Comments /
This paper describes the influence of Puritanism and Hawthorne’s life experiences in his short story, `Young Goodman Brown`.

This paper examines Hawthorne’s own life and Puritanical beliefs exhibited in his novel “Young Goodman Brown.” It provides detailed biographical information on the author’s life and analyzes the faith and nature of his religious perspective. The paper is loaded with quotes from the novel in support of analytical literary assessments.
`Nathaniel Hawthorne was born in Salem Massachusetts on July 4, 1804. Hawthorne had two sisters, Elizabeth and Louisa. He grew up with great access to the classics of English literature, as he injured his foot at age nine and couldn’t play outside for two years. In 1808, his father passed away, and in 1816, his family moved to Raymond, Maine, in a house on Lake Sebago. This provided Hawthorne with much solitude, which he cherished, for three years (Martin 5). In 1819, his mother sent him back to Salem to go to school. It was at this time that he began to write poetry. He also became a bookkeeper for his Uncle William. Hawthorne entered Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Mass., in 1821, and was the first of his family to attend college. He didn’t know what he wanted to be, however.`


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