An Analysis of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

English / April 23, 2015 / No Comments /
An analysis of the master-slave relationship between Frankenstein and his creator.

A study of the master-slave dialogues and the relationship between Frankenstein and his creator Victor Frankenstein. Their discussions throughout the story reflect upon this relationship and thus signify their roles and attitudes towards each other. It examines how Mary Shelley has wittily shown the facets of the relationship between the master and the slave by personifying each in its own role, and then the others. The master who becomes his creation’s slave and the creature who becomes his creator’s master. It explores the conversations between the master and the slave and looks to determine which is which.
Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein is categorically analyzed as occupying a defining moment in the evolution of thinking on the ethics of creation, and the phenomenon of monstrosity. It is essentially the story of Victor Frankenstein who goes to Ingolstadt to study science and ends up creating and bringing to life a monster. The monster is his creation and thus refers to Victor as his master and himself as his slave. Their dialects throughout the story reflect upon this relationship and thus signify their roles and attitudes towards each other. Shelley has wittily shown the facets of the relationship between the master and the slave by personifying each in its own role, and then the others. The master who becomes his creation’s slave and the creature who becomes his creator’s master. The following passage explores the conversations between the master and the slave and looks to determine which is which.


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