Theories of Language Acquisition: Peters, Chomsky, and Brown

Communication / April 23, 2015 / No Comments /
An assessment and description of the different aspects of the Peters’ Chomsky’s and Brown’s theories in detail and opinions on which theory proves to be the most successful and credible based on research.

`How does a child begin to speak? Why? These are questions that many linguists set out to answer as they explore the world of language acquisition. Three credible linguists, Ann M. Peters, Noam Chomsky, and Roger Brown, all have different opinions and theories of language acquisition. All of them address influences, grammar, and patterns of speech in their theories, but in different contexts. Chomsky believes it is genetic, Peters believes it is totally up to the environment, and Brown believes it is due to positive reinforcement and trial and error. All three theories are credible and have provided great insight into the ways children do acquire language. Language acquisition is a widely researched topic, and will continue to have new theories evolve as long as children keep talking. This paper assesses and describes different aspects of each linguists’ theory in detail and offers the author’s opinion on which theory proves to be the most successful and credible based on research.`


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