The Boeing Company

Accounting / April 23, 2015 / No Comments /
A financial analysis of the Boeing Company, through an examination of annual reports.

This paper examines the financial condition and performance of the Boeing Company, a publicly held company for the year 2001. Annual reports filed by Boeing in accordance with the General Accepted Accounting Principles and Securities and Exchange Commission regulations serve as primary data sources. Industry average financial ratios, outlook, and data are used to gauge Boeing’s financial status. Recommendations are presented based upon analysis, generally accepted management practice and research.
The terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center caused a major negative economic effect throughout the United States and the world. Airlines were severely impacted do to a sudden and huge drop in passengers (Siegel, M., p. 551). Air travel has still not fully recovered from this catastrophic event. The resultant drop in commercial jet orders has hurt Boeing (Friedman, p 13). In the third quarter of 2001, Boeing experienced a 46% decrease in orders compared to 2000 (Friedman, p. 19). The commercial aircraft segment accounted for about 60% of Boeings revenues before September 11 (Standard & Poor’s, 2002, p. 2). Deliveries for aircraft are expected to be 380 for 2002 vs.527 in 2001 (Siegel, M., p. 551). As reported in the 2001 Consolidated Statement of Operations, Boeing recorded a $935 million charge for “special charges due to events of September 11, 2001” (Boeing, p. 35).


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